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Heading for the Scottish Hills

Heading for the Scottish Hills

Three images, stalker, Heading for the Scottish Hills logo and family walking in the Scottish hills.

Can you spare a few minutes to help us to care for the hills?

Your help requested with our SURVEY below  (closing end of May)

Scotland’s upland paths are used and enjoyed by millions of walkers, climbers and mountain bikers every year, who contribute over £110M to the rural economy. Yet there is very little funding for upland path repair and no funding for maintenance. Both types of work are crucial to protect the landscape and fragile habitats and well  maintained paths can help to create great days on the hill.

Several organisations involved in upland path management including Scottish Natural Heritage, Mountaineering Scotland, John Muir Trust, National Trust for Scotland and the Outdoor Access Trust for Scotland, are working together to develop a more strategic approach to upland path management, but we need your help. Please spare a few minutes to tell us what you think about  our upland paths by clicking on the link below and completing our survey. Knowing what matters to you will help us to better understand and promote the importance of sustainable paths for locals and visitors to enjoy. 

Upland path survey:  https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/LNTKZM6

 

Heading for the Scottish Hills

Scotland offers fantastic hillwalking, but summer and autumn are also important times for deer stalking, which is essential for sustainable deer management.

This service helps you find out where this is taking place during the stag stalking season (1st July to 20th October, but with most stalking from August onwards), so you can plan routes which minimise the chance of disturbing stalking, in line with the Scottish Outdoor Access Code. The links below the map provide stalking information for hills in different areas of Scotland.

map showing the areas of the HFTSH service

1. ISLANDS

2. NORTHERN HIGHLANDS
North of Glen Shiel and the Great Glen.

3. WESTERN HIGHLANDS
West of the Great Glen and south of Glen Shiel.

4. CREAG MEAGAIDH AND THE MONADHLIATH

5. EASTERN HIGHLANDS
East of the A9 (Perth-Inverness).

6. CENTRAL HIGHLANDS
Area enclosed by Loch Linnhe, Glen Spean, the A9 (Inverness-Perth) and the A85 (Perth-Lochearnhead-Crianlarich-Oban). Includes Glen Coe, Glen Nevis, Ben Lawers, Ben Alder and the Drumochter Hills (west).

7. SOUTHERN HIGHLANDS
South of the A85 (Perth-Lochearnhead-Crianlarich-Oban).

8. SOUTHERN UPLANDS

 

Some estates provide broad messages indicating the general period in which stag stalking takes place, with contact details if further information is needed. These messages do not mean that the hills are inaccessible during this period, and are simply an aid to planning to help you minimise the chance of disturbing stalking. In the absence of more specific information, you can often minimise the risk of disturbance by using paths and following ridges. Take account of reasonable advice that you receive on the day, for example from a sign or a stalker. If you feel that a land manager has given you unreasonable advice, you can report this to the local access officer.

For more information on access rights and deer stalking, see Deer stalking on the open hill.